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Libertarian Presidential Nominee Declares CARES Act a Trojan horse

Libertarian Presidential Nominee Declares CARES Act a Trojan horse

Libertarian Presidential Nominee Dr. Jo Jorgensen says program will cost taxpayers $16K each

 

ORLANDO, Fla., July 11, 2020 —  “The $1,200 check politicians sent some of you is going to cost you more than $16,000,” said Dr. Jo Jorgensen of the so-called CARES Act, passed by Democratic and Republican lawmakers in March. “It’s a Trojan horse.”

Dr. Jo Jorgensen is the 2020 Libertarian presidential nominee; she delivered her acceptance speech on Friday at the Libertarian National Convention, which runs through one o’clock on Sunday in Orlando.

“Like a gift of a wooden sculpture filled with soldiers ready to attack, politicians may have sent you $1,200 under the CARES Act, and maybe they threw a bonus in with your unemployment checks,” she explained. “But if you are the average taxpayer, you will pony up $16,050 to pay for all the pork that they handed out to special interests along with it.”  

The $2.3 trillion CARES Act will be paid for by American workers in the form of future taxes and devaluation of the dollar.

Both Democrats and Republicans in Congress are getting ready to pass yet another massive stimulus bill with a staggering price tag of between one and three trillion dollars.

“Rather than pass another pork-barrel bill that will cost taxpayers much more in future taxes and inflation than the amount of their measly payouts, lawmakers need to end government-mandated shutdowns so people can get back to work, businesses can survive, and life can return to normal,” she said.  

“Today there’s nothing people need more than jobs,” said Jorgensen. “And if we don’t restore a fully functioning economy, many businesses and jobs will be lost in spite of these bills. So the best way to create jobs is to open the economy and allow, not politicians, but individuals and businesses to decide for themselves how best to weigh the risks of the pandemic versus their economic well-being.”